Twist and Shout:
Amazingly, in early 1963, most American teenagers couldn't tell you who The Beatles were. One year later, they would bring a musical revolution to America. In 1961 and 1962 The Beatles had grown in popularity in Britain through performances at The Cavern Club in Liverpool. They had also gained considerable experience playing clubs in Hamburg, Germany. They had auditioned for some U.S. labels, but were turned down (notably by Decca). But eventually they were signed to Capitol, but not until after the smaller Vee Jay label had received the rights to produce some of their early recordings. As their popularity increased, they were signed to come to the states and perform on the Ed Sullivan show. Not since Elvis Presley's appearance seven years earlier had their been such excitement over a rock and roll performance. Their first single for Capitol, "I Want to Hold Your Hand" wasn't supposed to be released in the states until January but as early copies leaked out to radio stations, Capitol decided to release the single (with "I Saw Her Standing There" on the flip side) on December 26th. On February 1st, "I Want to Hold Your Hand" knocked Bobby Vinton's "There, I've Said It Again" out of the #1 spot. On February 9th they appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show. Over the next three months, "She Loves You" and "Can't Buy Me Love" would follow the first U.S. Beatle record to #1. Those were all from Capitol records. At the same time, Vee Jay records issued singles of "Please, Please Me," "Twist and Shout," and "Do You Want to Know a Secret," all of which would make it into the top 5.
Title Year

A Hard Day's Night

1964

Do You Want to Know a Secret

1964

I Want to Hold Your Hand

1964

Twist and Shout

1964

Can't Buy Me Love

1964

Love Me Do

1964

Please Please Me

1964

She Loves You

1964

Eight Days a Week

1965

Help

1965

She's a Woman

1965

Yesterday

1965

I Feel Fine

1965

Ticket to Ride

1965

She's a woman

1965

Eleanor Rigby

1966

Yellow Submarine

1966

Day Tripper

1966

We Can Work It Out

1966

Paperback Writer

1966

Nowhere Man

1966

Rain

1966

All You Need Is Love

1967

Penny Lane

1967

Sargeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

1967

Lucy in the Skies With Diamonds

1967

Strawberry Fields Forever

1967

With a Little Help From My Friends

1967

Don't Let Me Down

1967

Hey Jude

1968

Hello Goodbye

1968

Revolution

1968

Get Back

1969

The Ballad of John and Yoko

1969

Something

1969

Let It Be

1970

The Long and Winding Road

1970

The Beatles
"Introducing the Beatles" was a hastily put together LP that Vee Jay records released in January of 1964. Originally it included two other Beatles songs, "Love Me Do" and "P.S. I Love You" but when threatened with a law suit because they didn't have clear rights to those songs, Vee Jay pulled them and re-released the album. The album was released in several different formats -- primarily differentiated by the back cover. None of the versions contained any "liner notes" typical of albums released at the time -- one indicaton of how desperate Vee Jay was to get the album to market in the wake of the sudden popularity of The Beatles. The record was first pressed in July of 1963 but financial difficulties and legal disputes kept the album from being released until January of 1964. I was like most other sixteen year olds at the time -- I was glued to the television set the night The Beatles first appeared. Shortly afterwards, I bought the single 45's of "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "She Loves You." Then, I bought "Introducing the Beatles." I was no doubt attracted to the album because it contained "covers" of so many familiar former U.S. hits ("Chains," "Twist and Shout," "Baby It's You."). Recent internet searches led me to discover that "Introducing the Beatles" is the most counterfeited album ever. My copy is a legitimate original and is reportedly worth from $50 to $100. To save money at the time (approximatel $1) I tended to buy "maonaural" versions. Had I bought the stereo version, it would be worth about $500.